A Smart Investment for Your Future

Taking advantage of law school academic coaching isn’t just a smart move–it’s a sound investment decision that minimizes your financial risk.

HOW YOUR LAW SCHOOL COACH MINIMIZES RISK

We see financial risk management all the time in our everyday lives. Think about when you bought your phone–you were probably offered a protection plan. If you’ve ever bought a plane ticket or booked a cruise, they ask you if you want trip insurance. I’ve even been offered a protection plan on a toaster oven before. It’s a way to give yourself some extra security in case something goes wrong.

Those things have risk management plans and they are only small and medium-sized purchases…but law school? That’s a major financial decision. According to U.S. News, this was the average annual cost of law school for the 2019-20 academic year:

Law School Type

Cost Per Year

Public, in-state

$28,264

Public, out-of-state

$41,726

Private

$49,548

Over three years, you can expect to pay anywhere from $84,792 (in-state, public) to $148,644 or more (private). If you’re going to spend that much money on your education, you had better make sure you are protecting your investment–and working with Your Law School Coach is a great way. I don’t just tell you what to do when things go wrong; I help you keep them from going wrong in the first place.

THE PRICE OF YOUR LAW SCHOOL COACH IS A BARGAIN

Almost $85,000. That’s the minimum amount it can cost you to go to law school…and that’s if you do well. I’m going to level with you and give you the inside scoop on what happens when you don’t do well in your first year of law school. Most law schools hate to talk about this when they’re recruiting because it’s not fun information, but I need you to know this now so you get how important this is.

WHAT LAW SCHOOLS DON’T WANT TO TELL YOU

After your first semester, many law schools will review your academic performance to determine whether you are at risk of failing out. The process, what it is called, and the applicable GPA cutoff varies from school to school, but generally, this is how it goes:

ACADEMIC PROBATION. Students who don’t meet a threshold GPA requirement at the end of their first year of law school are typically placed on academic probation. During probation, you may have restrictions placed on you that could include the following:*

  • Restriction on the number of credit hours you’re allowed to take. If your law school caps the number of credits you can take, you’ll have to either take summer classes for the rest of law school to keep up, or go to school for an extra semester to finish your degree. $$$
  • Prohibited from participation in on-campus interviews (OCI). If you have your heart set on BigLaw, OCI is the start of the pipeline for that dream. Many top-tier firms only interview using OCI, so you don’t want to get locked out of this opportunity. $$$
  • Prohibited from participation in school-arranged externships. Externships are how you get real legal experience for class credit while you’re still a student, and are a springboard for making connections and finding a job.
  • Restriction from consideration for clinics. Some clinics may have a minimum GPA for you to be allowed to apply, especially if it’s in a specialized area of law.
  • Loss or reduction of your scholarships (if you got them). You’ll have to pay the difference out-of-pocket or take out more loans. $$$ $$$
  • Loss of federal financial aid if you have loans. Federal law requires you to be in good academic standing to keep getting financial aid. This leads some students to start working to pay for school as they go, which takes them longer and can also cause academic problems. $$$

*Key: $$$ costs you money  $$$ loss of income  career obstacle

ACADEMIC DISMISSAL. In the ultimate negative outcome, students who don’t meet the minimum GPA requirement at the end of 1L year are typically dismissed from law school and have to wait for a certain period of time before they can reapply…and getting back in isn’t guaranteed. Click here to learn more about the challenges that come with being academically dismissed from law school.

Students who don’t meet a threshold GPA requirement at the end of their first year of law school are typically placed on academic probation. During probation, you may have restrictions placed on you that could include the following:
Restriction Effect $$$ $$$
Restriction on the number of credit hours you’re allowed to take If your law school caps the number of credits you can take, you’ll have to either take summer classes for the rest of law school to keep up, or go to school for an extra semester to finish your degree.

Prohibited from participation in on-campus interviews (OCI) If you have your heart set on BigLaw, OCI is the start of the pipeline for that dream. Many top-tier firms only interview using OCI.

Prohibited from participation in school-arranged externships Externships are how you get real legal experience for class credit while you’re still a student, and are a springboard for making connections and finding a job.

Restriction from consideration for clinics Some clinics may have a minimum GPA for you to be allowed to apply, especially if it’s in a specialized area of law.

Loss or reduction of your scholarships (if you got them) You’ll have to pay the difference out-of-pocket or take out more loans. 

Loss of federal financial aid if you have loans Federal law requires you to be in good academic standing to keep getting financial aid. This leads some students to start working to pay for school as they go, which takes them longer and can also cause academic problems.

Key: $$$ costs you money  $$$ loss of income  career obstacle

In the ultimate negative outcome, students who don’t meet the minimum GPA requirement at the end of 1L year (and sometimes, at the end of their very first semester) are typically dismissed from law school and have to wait for a certain period of time before they can reapply…and getting back in isn’t guaranteed. Click here to learn more about the challenges that come with being academically dismissed from law school.

When you look at the possible consequences associated with not doing well during your 1L year, it becomes clear that the cost of working with Your Law School Coach is a fraction of the amount of money you might spend or lose access to in the short term and the rest of your career. 

Secure your future. Act now and take the first step to protect your most important investment: yourself.

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Important Information

In her capacity as Your Law School Coach, Kristin DiBiase is not a representative, agent or affiliate of Indiana University. Use of Your Law School Coach products and services does not create a contractual relationship between you and Indiana University and will not improve your chances of admission to Indiana University McKinney School of Law (IU McKinney) or Indiana University Maurer School of Law.